Marvell v. Carnegie Mellon University Amicus Brief

Carnegie Mellon sued Marvell Technology Group for patent infringement based on method patents related to chips in hard-disk drives. Marvell had used the patented methods in the United States during testing of its chips as part of its sales cycle. The jury ruled for Carnegie Mellon, and its damages award included a royalty on chips that were manufactured and distributed abroad as a direct result of a Marvell’s infringement in the United States. Goodwin represented a group of research universities as amici curiae, arguing about the importance of allowing U.S.-based patent owners to recover based on foreign sales that were the direct result of U.S.-based infringement. The Federal Circuit held that U.S. patentees could recover such sales as long as the infringing products were “sold” in the United States under 35 U.S.C. § 271(a). The court remanded for a more thorough determination of where the infringing products were “sold.”

Marvell v. Carnegie Mellon University Amicus Brief

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